So, an actual full slate of singles play took place at the Sao Paulo Challenger today (well, almost, haha), and – on the off chance that my nauseatingly-detailed tweets weren’t enough for you (or you missed all of my 140-character gems entirely) – I will now provide a nauseatingly-detailed recap of Wednesday’s action out of the goodness of my heart.  And at no extra cost to you, dear reader!

Well, I woke up and was writing my snarky preview about how there’d be no tennis today.  When all of a sudden, on a whim, I decided to launch livestreams and scoreboards and stumbled upon a minor miracle: after days of deluge, there was play in Sao Paulo! Hallelujah and praise Jesus (that’s the guy with the squeegee’s name, I’m pretty sure: Jesus Silva, no doubt).

We joined the action with Federico Delbonis (one word, the ATP spells it wrong – thanks Marcos for the tip!) leading Tiago Lopes 7-5, Guillermo Alcaide over Daniele Giorgini 6-3 2-3, Giovanni Lapentti in a first set tiebreak with Ricardo Hocevar, and Joao Souza warming up with Matteo Trevisan on the postage stamp-sized livestream.  It wasn’t long before the seventh seeded Delbo had closed out his match in dual 7-5 sets, while Alcaide wrapped up his match in three, winning 6-3 4-6 6-3.

A Little Delbo Room – Federico Delbonis, clearly practicing on Petr Korda’s home court

As it should have done after several days delay, the tennis was coming faster and furiouser than Vin Diesel on a Wayne Odesnik hypodermic cocktail.  Before I knew it, Souza had come back from a set down to win the second set 6-3 with a hearty cry of “Vamos!” for good measure.  Trevisan was then sprayed/rubbed and otherwise fondled (and possibly deloused) in the legular region, MTO-style.  And before I knew it (again), Souza had closed out the match (this time with a hearty cry of “Allez!” – such variety!) 4-6 6-3 6-1, much to the delight of the local crowd.  But the real question we need to ask here is: why did things keep happening before I knew them?  A disturbing trend, to be sure.  Anyway, the 3rd-seeded Souza will play Giovanni Lapentti, who beat Ricardo Hocevar 7-6(6) 6-4 in the 2nd round. Lapentti leads their head-to-head 3 to 2.

And then the still-Swedish wildcard Christian Lindell made it into my livestream crosshairs against the always-Argentinian Andres Molteni.  Lindell dictated play early, serving 4 aces, ruling rallies and racing to a 4-1* first set lead.  Molteni was muttery.  Meanwhile, on another court, I notice that Uladzimir Ignatik has bageled eighth seed Paul Capdeville in the third set, getting the upset 7-5 3-6 6-0.  Later I learned that Capdeville had been sick and cramping in that final set.  Oh.

Also meanwhile on another court, Horacio Zeballos was upwarming for his match against Julio Silva.  Why the second seed was scheduled to play a Brazilian on any court other than Court Central left me mystified and bewildered.  I mean, I know they’re backlogged with matches, but only 4 total contests were even scheduled on the main (and streamed) court today, with 5 matches on all the others.  Surely they could’ve made some room for their second seed, no?  No.

Regardless, Molteni started to make a good go of it on Court Central while he was there (and why not?). He charged back in the 2nd set, served to force a tiebreak, and found himself at triple set point 6-3*. Lindell held to 5-6*, but then Molteni netrushed and Lindell melted, making an error of induction on set point numero tres.  Second set to Molteni to the 22 year-old Argie, 76(5).

Continue reading