Tag Archive: Brazil F38


Brazil F1 Futures Update!

All first round matches have now been played, and it’s so far so good for the seeds in Sao Paulo; [1] Rogerio Dutra Da Silva, [2] Guillermo Alcaide, [3] Ulazdimir Ignatik, [4] Ciao Zampieri, [5] Ricardo Hocevar, [6] Tsung-Hua Yang, [7] Thomas Fabbiano and [8] Daniel Silva all won in straight sets (well, except for Alcaide – thanks for ruining my narrative, Guillermo!) to advance to round two of the Brazil F1 Futures Bradesco Prime Cup.

Two talented Brazilian youngsters – 17 year-old former world junior #1 Tiago Fernandes and 16 year-old Thiago Moura Monteiro* – put up decent fights against their more-seasoned opponents, Fernandes losing 1-6 5-7 to the Italian Fabbiano and Monteiro going down 3-6 4-6 to the Belarussian Ignatik.

Tiago Fernandes – Coming Soon To a Court Near You

Among the non-seeds, there were a few noteworthy results, which I shall now note. Friend of the site Fernando Romboli continued his 11-match roll in defeating Danilo Ferraz 6-1 6-4, keeping his potential Player To Watch hopes alive. The 21 year-old from Rio admitted coming into the tournament he was a little tired, having won the season-ending Brazil F37 and F38 tournaments in back-to-back weeks heading into this one. But he had no trouble in dispatching his countryman, who had been coming ever closer to beating Fernando in their previous four matches. Alas, Ferraz couldn’t match Romboli’s newfound form, and is now 0-5 against Fernando in their head-to-head meetings, with four of those losses coming this year.  Romboli will go for his 12th straight win against the fifth seeded Hocevar in R2.

Fernando Romboli looks forward toward potential Player To Watchdom

Gastao Elias also posted an encouraging win, taking out the winner of the awesomely-matched Racy-Semenzato FQR, beating the qualifier Bruno Semenzato 6-4 6-1. Elias is someone who once graced the great Steve G.’s “Young Guns” spreadsheet over at the soon-to-be-sadly-defunct stevegtennis.com. A former #6 combined junior in the world who won the Eddie Herr International in 2007, the 21 year-old Portuguese Davis Cup stalwart has been absolutely crippled by injuries the past couple of years. Great to see him on his feet of late and hopefully healthy. He’ll play top-seed Dutra Da Silva (who, according to this article, is brother of eighth seed Daniel) in the next round.

Elias – on his feet again (although he’s off them in this particular photo)

More updates coming soon – watch this space!

*You say “Tiago”, I say “Thiago” – let’s call the whole thing off.

Brazil F38 Wrap-Up – Romboli Rolls To Fourth Futures Title

Do you, like me, bemoan the fact that everything is closed on Christmas Day? Well, let me tell you something. We’re wrong. Not everything is closed on Christmas Day. Certainly not the freakin’ Tenis Clube de Sorocaba, where the 10K Brazil F38 Futures is played.

You certainly won’t hear Fernando Romboli or Thales Turini moaning about it. They were working.

In case you haven’t pieced it out yourself by now, the finals of the 10K Brazil F38 took place on Christmas Day between second-seeded Fernando Romboli and sixth-seeded Thales Turini, both of Brazil.

If you’re too lazy to click on my previous Romboli profile, then I’ll repeat the important bits here: “the 21-year-old Romboli had gone into last week’s final with an 0-3 head-to-head record against the 25-year-old Kirche, only to make like Donner and blitz him 6-1 6-0 in the final. I’ll be interested to see whether that result was an anomaly, or if the former #3 world junior – who had wins over people like Roberto Bautista-Agut, Thomas Schoorel, Benoit Paire and Grigor Dimitrov – has finally turned a corner against his older foe. Can Romboli finish off his 48 win, 19 loss season (so far) with a 2nd consecutive tournament victory and reach the 50-win plateau?” Actually, that’s all of it, so no real need to click (and my apologies if you did).

And, of course, the title of this article is the ultimate spoiler. “ Can Romboli finish off his 48 win, 19 loss season (so far) with a 2nd consecutive tournament victory and reach the 50-win plateau?” YES HE CAN! And did, with great style and (if Jason Goodall had been there to watch, he probably would’ve said) with considerable aplomb. Romboli cruised in the final 6-2 6-1 over Turini, pocketing $1300 of Christmas cash.

Fernando Romboli – your Sorocabo Brazil F38 Futures Champion

“I spent Christmas night at the hotel with my family. We had dinner at 21:30 and was asleep and just thinking about the game. But it’s part, so tennis is, no dates. Today I had a great gift and reward for the work they’ve been doing,” said Romboli, according to this Google-translated article.

I’m actually quite pleased to see his game suddenly taking hold on the pro circuit, although I’m not supposed to admit it. Next stop for the man from Rio: Christmas lunch with his family today, and then tomorrow he starts preparation for Monday’s Brazil F1 match! No rest for the wicked, I guess. Or the people who have to work on Christmas.

(note: F1 preview coming (very) soon!)

Brazil F38 Futures Update!

The words “travel” and “travail” are formed from the same root because, back when their etymology was fresh, it was once a horrific pain in the ass to travel anywhere of length (traveling of width wasn’t nearly as difficult). Now it’s just a mild pain in the ass, comparatively. But back before technology had somewhat tamed our poor, defenseless planet, before one could jet or ride somewhere, way back when/then… only soldiers or slaves usually deigned to travel any distance, because you might get killed by Nature or Huns or something equally as terrifying as Nature and Huns (though that is hard to fathom, I know).

All of which leads me to this trivia question for you (answer at bottom of this article):

Q: How many non-Brazilians made it into the 2nd Round of the Brazil F38 Futures event in Sorocaba? Did you get it right? (Note: only the answer “Brazilch” is correct. Answers like “zero” or “none” will not be accepted.) Regardless, the point of this whole pointless exercise is that no travelers made it out the first round in Sorocaba alive. Granted, this stat is less impressive when one learns that only three foreigners made the trip in the first place, but still: now only homegrown homeboys (and homemen) are left; to the Brazilians go the spoils!

So, what’s happening among the about-to-be-spoiled Brazilians, you ask? Fantastic question! Really, no, it is. You should be quite pleased with yourself. That’s what this whole article is for – to answer that fantastic question of yours. Do read on.

Well, to start with, 7th seed Danilo Ferraz is seeing dimishing returns in his tennistical journey of late, posting consecutive SF, SF, QF, and R1 showings in Futures 34, 36, 37 and 38. He lost to Charles Costa (no relation) (to anyone) in the first round. And third-seeded Rodrigo Guidolin was the only other seed to not make the quarterfinals. He lost to a person who had never posted an ITF-recorded win at any level (juniors or pros) before, Luiz-Guilherme Deneka (who promptly lost in the next round, of course). Way to go, Rodrigo! It says in his bio that he enjoys going to the cinema, so at least he’s got more time to do that now.

In the quarters, 6th seed Thales Turini continued his Streak of Recent Relative Hotness, defeating top-seed Daniel Silva 6-2 6-2 and extending his record to 12/3 in his previous 15 matches. He’ll meet Deneka-defeater Ricardo Siggia, the 8th seed, in the semis. But all of that is academic, because I think the winner of this tournament will emerge from the other QF, which is a rematch of last week’s final. That’s right: it’s Leonardo Kirche vs. Fernando Romboli, The Revenge!

Pictured: Andre Miele and Fernando Romboli, who apparently won something once

If you’ll recall (and you probably won’t, because I didn’t write about it), the 21-year-old Romboli had gone into last week’s final with an 0-3 head-to-head record against the 25-year-old Kirche, only to make like Donner and blitz him 6-1 6-0 in the final. I’ll be interested to see whether that result was an anomaly, or if the former #3 world junior – who had wins over people like Roberto Bautista-Agut, Thomas Schoorel, Benoit Paire and Grigor Dimitrov – has finally turned a corner against his older foe.  Can Romboli finish off his 48 win, 19 loss season (so far) with a 2nd consecutive tournament victory and reach the 50-win plateau? Watch this space for more. Or, alternatively, go and enjoy your holiday. I’ll probably be here when you get back.

A: Brazilch

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