Tag Archive: Oleksandr Nedovyesov


This week’s W.A.T.C.H. List is pretty damn diversified, with players earning their points from ATP 500s and 250s all the way down to 10K Futures level. Something for everyone. My kind of List.

Interested? Well, then. Look below to see Who’s Achieved Their Career Highs this week:

Player NATIONALITY Age New High Why
Bradley Klahn USA 23 66 others lost points
Jiri Vesely CZE 20 77 ATP 250 Memphis R2
Aleksandr Nedovyesov KAZ 27 92 Kolkata SF
Dominic Thiem AUT 20 99 ATP 500 Rotterdam Q/R16
Pierre Hugues-Herbert FRA 22 134 Quimper W
Yuki Bhambri IND 21 143 Kolkata R2
Blaz Rola SLO 23 152 others lost points
Hiroki Moriya JPN 23 166 others lost points
Marton Fucsovics HUN 22 173 Bergamo QF
Andrea Arnaboldi ITA 26 180 Bergamo SF
Albano Olivetti FRA 22 194 Quimper QF
Lorenzo Giustino ITA 22 223 Bergamo R2
Daniel Cox GBR 23 244 Kolkata R2
Adrian Sikora SVK 25 277 ATP 500 Rotterdam QR2
Jose Pereira BRA 23 298 Egypt F4 F
Stefano Travaglia ITA 22 305 Egypt F4 W
Gabriel Alejandro Hidalgo ARG 23 338 Argentina F2 F
Oliver Golding GBR 20 362 Portugal F1 W
Ivan Arenas-Gualda ESP 23 377 Portugal F1 SF
Federico Coria ARG 21 386 Argentina F2 SF

Though it’s usually not in my harsh and uncompromising nature to feature “others-point-losers” in these here below-the-table write-ups, I just want to point out that out of the last 15 W.A.T.C.H. Lists, Mr. Bradley Klahn has been on 8 of them.

And only twice because others lost points. Traralgon Challenger finalist, Yeongwol Challenger winner, Yokohama Challenger semifinalist, Maui Challenger titlist, West Lakes Challenger champ — what an amazing four months it’s been for the former three-time Stanford All-American.

The Bradth of Klahn - Bradley with the West Lakes Trophy

The Bradth of Klahn – Bradley with the West Lakes Trophy

Klahn now is firmly entrenched as the American #3 and is now only 69 ATPoints behind Sam Querrey for the #2 spot. He’s also advancing at such a consistent rate that he may soon be an ATP Tour-level player only, meaning he’ll no longer have a place on this site. *sniffle*

And third on this week’s List is another three-time All-American, this time from Oklahoma State, Aleksandr Nedovyesov of Kazakhstan (formerly Oleksandr Nedovyesov of the Ukraine, before he succumbed to the Kazakh Tennis Relocation Program), who was cold-cocked in the Kolkata Challenger semifinals by the Serbian lumberjack, Ilija Bozoljac.

Nedov Yes So Very Questionable Form Here

Nedov Yes So Very Questionable Form Here

It was still enough to rise another spot on the ATP carte du jour, career highdom achieved.  So, to professionally summarize the List so far: U.S. college tennis. Woot woot!

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Why yes, I do know it’s Wednesday.  But on Sunday only one of these articles had been published, which would’ve made the Reading List more of a Reading Single Item.  So, like the WTF-delayed W.A.T.C.H. list, this article is merely content delayed.  (And I had to make it a “Sunday” list to keep the cherished tradition* alive for the readers who love it so.)  Besides, Wednesday is Sundae at Carvel.

Moving along from day-related nonsense, our first item is the only one that was available before Sunday. And in fact, it was available in August, though for reasons unbeknownst to me it only started making the rounds last week.  It’s a Forbes article detailing the monetary difficulties for the lower-ranked players on tour, through the eyes of Michael Russell.

Muscles Hustles

Muscles Hustles

I’ve long been one decrying the harsh economic realities for those on the Challenger/Futures circuit, and this article brings into sharp relief how tennis can be more of a fiscal challenge than a physical one.  This quote from Patrick McEnroe is the heart of it:

And if players are not competing on the ATP tour regularly,  the math for staying in the game makes less sense. Patrick McEnroe, General Manager of Player Development at the United States Tennis Association, said the possibility of talented youngsters eschewing tennis for more lucrative sports “is what keeps me up at night. If you have a 7 year old, it’s much easier to sign him up for basketball than tennis. The challenge with tennis, is that once they’re exposed, it takes a lot of time and organization to make players significantly better.”

It’s what keeps me up at night too, PMac.  It’s fairly horrifying to know that these players whom I regularly watch, these guys who are so damn talented, might have to give up the game simply because, that particular year, they weren’t making ends meet.  With the average age of the Top 100 escalating to around 27-years-old, this is kind of akin to a player having to submit to a years-long unpaid internship, as they struggle with the grind of everything else on tour.  Maybe next year is the year they would’ve broke through, but they have to quit this year because they can’t make ends meet.

What a nightmare.

And it’s why players are scurrying to challengers all over the world this week, trying to earn those ATPoints that will get them into the main draw of the Australian Open, where just appearing in the draw earns players $23,000.

The next articles are a bit more upbeat, thankfully.  This business insider article continues with the monetary theme but with a brighter fiscal forecast. It’s, I dunno, comforting (?) to know that after some of these players quit because they can’t make money, maybe they’ll make lots of money after they quit.  It’s reverse incentivising.  Or something.

Maybe it’s just due to my poor memory, but what I’ve found is that when players on the lower circuits retire, there’s no announcement, no fanfare at all. And sometimes it takes weeks or months before I’m looking at a draw and think, “Hey, whatever happened to…” [insert player name]. I’m happy to find some of them folk in the confines of this Business Insider piece.

I see you, Barry King!

I see you, Barry King!

Foot Soldiers of Tennis has weighed in with its annual look at which players have successfully qualified for the most ATP World Tour events this year, a.k.a. the Kings of Qualifying. So click the link and find out who is the biggest KOQ.

The East Central Illinois News Gazette offers a well-written and -researched look at Rajeev Ram returning to the Champaign Challenger at the place where he was part of the legendary 2003 NCAA-champion 32-0 Illini team of 2003.  It also hits on other members of the team, past and present.

Lastly — and speaking of former college stars — this week’s Challenger Tour Finals participant and 2009 ITA Player of the Year, Oleksandr Nedovyesov is the focus of Josh Meiseles’s excellent article for the ATP World Tour website, describing the decision-making parameters inherent in a player’s choice to either turn pro or play for a top U.S. school.

The 26-year-old Ukrainian has been on W.A.T.C.H. Lists aplenty as he’s gobbled up titles and soared to a spot in the Top 100.

That’s all for now. Tune in whenever the next day is that I decide is Sunday!

*two weeks now and running strong!

It’s time for my beloved weekly series*, Sunday’s Challenger Champions!  If it’s Sunday, then it must be time to take a look at this week’s titlists.

First and definitely foremost, almost-Argie Pablo Cuevas is one of the more popular champions in recent memory. The former ATP #45 has been injured for the past two years, didn’t play a match in 2012 and was considering retirement. But the current ATP #401 rolled into the $75K Copa Topper Buenos Aires Challenger and promptly rolled through the field.

Cuevas, The Almost Argie

Cuevas, The Almost Argie

Well, it wasn’t that easy. But he started off with a straight-set win vs. 4th seed Thomaz Bellucci and straight-setted and walkovered his way to the semi-final, where he met and beat 22-year-old Argentine (and frequent WATCH Lister) Guido Andreozzi 7-6(0) 6-0 6-3. Then it was onto the final, where he faced the fiery Argie, Facundo Arguello, he of the fearsome forehand and Gaudio-esque temper.

Arguello’s been on my W.A.T.C.H. Lists practically every week, so he’s up and definitely coming.  And Arguello went up early 3-0*, his forehand seeming laser-sharp and -focused, but Cuevas rallied (literally, hurr hurr) to force a TB.  (Along the way, fiery Facu violently bounced his racket right in front of a frightened ballboy, and also destroyed a courtside microphone, making me quite terrified that I ever referred to his hair as Muppet-like. Don’t Fac with Facu!)

Cuevas had the breaker on his racket, but double-faulted to 5-all.  He got a set point on Arguello’s serve, but the Argie saved it with a wrong-footing forehand. The next set point was on Cuevas’s serve, and the Uruguayan made no mistake, opening the point up with a beautiful backhand down the line and finishing the point and the high-quality, ATP-level set with an inside-in forehand winner.

The next two sets weren’t as inspired, but the end was dramatic. Pablo went on walkabout in set two, with Arguello winning it 6-2.  Cuevas went up an early break and led 4-1*.  After a lengthy medical time-out for Arguello, the 21-year-old firebrand came out and held then broke and suddenly we were back on serve in the decider.

Tight from there until the very last point, where Cuevas broke to take the title 7-6(6), 2-6, 7-5 and fell to his knees in triumph. Since his mother is Argentinian, he was born in Argentina, and he trains in Buenos Aires itself, the crowd loved his victory.

Cuevas will leap back into the Top 250 with the win, and Arguello will rise to a career high ~#135 when the new rankings are released on Monday. It was Cuevas’s 7th Challenger title (in ten attempts), but his first challenger final since 2010.

At the Kazan Kremlin Cup $75K Challenger, former Oklahoma State University standout Oleksandr Nedovyesov continues his near-meteoric rise through the ATP ranks, claiming the $10,800 that comes with the title as well as the 100 ATP points to add to his ever-building cache.  Other than a three-set struggle in round two against Belarussian Egor Gerasimov, Nedovyesov veritably breezed into the final, where he met hit-or-miss Kazakh blaster, Andrey Golubev.

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It’s Monday, and you know what that means: another W.A.T.C.H. List! So let’s see Who’s Achieved Their Career Highs this week*:

Player NATIONALITY Age New High
Edouard Roger-Vasselin FRA 29 64
Pablo Carreno-Busta ESP 22 66
Kenny de Schepper FRA 26 67
Joao Sousa POR 24 77
Jack Sock USA 20 79
Julian Reister GER 27 92
Alejandro Gonzalez COL 24 108
Diego Sebastian Schwartzman ARG 21 112
Oleksandr Nedovyesov UKR 26 116
Dominic Thiem AUT 20 150
Guilherme Clezar BRA 20 177
Renzo Olivo ARG 21 180
Kristijan Mesaros CRO 25 193
Gerald Melzer AUT 23 197
Pierre Hugues-Herbert FRA 22 199
Blaz Rola SLO 22 202
Mirza Basic BIH 22 204
Norbert Gombos SVK 23 214
Marton Fucsovics HUN 21 230
Valery Rudnev RUS 25 263
Shuichi Sekiguchi JPN 22 265
Patricio Heras ARG 24 269
Hiroki Kondo JPN 30 279
Kimmer Coppejans BEL 19 289
Victor Baluda RUS 20 290
Mikhail Biryukov RUS 21 294
Bjorn Fratangelo USA 20 296
Alexander Rumyantsev RUS 21 297

A week ago, there was this idiot banging the doom drums re: the lack of young Americans achieving career high rankings post-US Open.  Well that’s because no one was playing in those weeks, idiot! This week sees two young Americans, Jack Sock and Bjorn Fratangelo, charting career highs — they each made the semis of the Kaohsiung and Campinas Challengers, respectively.  Hopefully this will shut that guy up!

Jack Sock - Challenger Tennis's Original Mascot

Jack Sock – Challenger Tennis’s Original Mascot

Meanwhile, the rise of the young Argentinians continues, seemingly unrelentingly. I wonder, though, what kind of ceiling 5′ 7” (1.70 meters) Diego Schwartzman will have.** I’ve been very impressed with his game and the power he can generate with his small frame, but we’ve seen players of similar heights struggle to move up the rankings before (Ricardas Berankis and Olivier Rochus are the first ones who come to mind).  On the other hand, there’s Michael Chang and, more recently, David Ferrer.  So time will tell if the Schwartzman’s height limitation will also limit his height on the rankings ladder.

May The Schwartz Be With You

May The Schwartz Be With You

Either way, you just know that the second David Nalbandian – whose lifelong tennistical goal has been to win the Davis Cup for his country – retires, this contingent of young Argies will probably win it.  Maybe Nalby (who, incidentally, fell 8 spots to #232 in this week’s rankings) will at least get to be coach if/when that happens.

This weekend saw some big results for guys who played collegiately in the US: Oleksandr Nedovyesov, winner of the Sczecin Challenger and former All American/ITA Player of the Year for Oklahoma State, is up 34 spots. While Ohio State’s 2012 NCAA doubles champion and 2013 NCAA singles champ, Blaz Rola, rolled on up 23 spots to #202, courtesy of his semifinal showing at the Kenitra Challenger. As if we needed more evidence, it’s clearly looking more increasingly viable for college players to make a smooth transition to the pros — I really don’t think John Isner will be college athletics’ one-hit wonder***.

Rola Rollin'

Rola Rollin’

Apropos of absolutely nothing, two of my favorite tennis names made it onto this week’s List: Norbert Gombos and Marton Fucsovics. Long may they rise!

Finally, Filip Peliwo, who some morons were saying only has a 14% change of making the Top 200 while he’s still in his teens (aka another 4ish months), won the $15,000 Markham F9 Futures in Canadia, and the 27 ATPts he takes from there will zoom him up to ~250th when his points are added next week (Futures points aren’t usually added until 8 days after its final is played).  He now needs ~51 pts to make the Top 200, so 2 more comparable victories can get him there.

Oh, and in case you didn’t click either of those links above, the “idiot” and “moron” I referred to was me in both instances.  *bows theatrically*

*ranked between #60 and 300, that is

**here’s where a less classy writer would make a “at least there’s plenty of room under the ceiling at that height” joke. But I would never. Not even in the footnotes.

*** why yes, I am trying to make a joke about his serve ending most points.

Challenger Round-Up: This Week’s Top Stories

There have been seven (7) (SEVEN!!!) challengers happening all around the globe this week, so there’s bound to be a bunch of interesting stories.  Here are the best of them:

€64,000 Izmir Challenger (Hard, Acrylic) – Izmir’s been center stage for the amazing and continuing comeback of Irish(ger)man Louk Sorensen.  After not playing a pro match between July 2012 and July 2013 (that’s a whole year — I did the math!), the 28-year-old started his ’13 campaign with three wins and three losses. Since then, he’s gone on a ten-and-three tear.  This includes a six-match win streak at Izmir alone, where he’s run the gauntlet from qualies all the way to the final. Sunday he faces top-seeded Mikhail Kukushkin for the title.

Louk Out!

Louk Out!

Also worth noting is a good week of work from Izmir doubles champions Tennys Sandgren and Austin Krajicek. The second seeds took down the 4th-seeded team of Brydan Klein and Dane Propoggia 7-6(4) 6-4.  It was the pair’s second challenger title together (2013 Tallahassee Chally).

TAMU/UT-Power

Sandgren and Krajicek: A UT/TAMU-Powered Pairing

€30,000 Kenitra Challenger (Red Clay) – Dominic Thiem took home the championship here, and his road to the title was rife with rubbernecking opportunities.  For instance, I still don’t know what to make of the 20-year-old Austrian’s animal-caught-in-a-trap caterwauling in celebration of a big point during his 6-7(7) 6-0 7-6(2) Austrian Grudge Rematch with Gerald Melzer.  Said match was contested with an intensity befitting a final, owing to the fact that most pro tennis-playing Austrians are upset with Thiem; he sat out their recent Davis Cup tie due to his not receiving what he felt is proper monetary compensation, you see*.

When Gerald beat Dom a couple of weeks ago at the Meknes Challenger, older brother Jurgen tweeted thusly:

jurgen's celebratory tweet

And if that weren’t enough, then there was the actual final, where Teimuraz Gabashvili retired with Thiem serving just two points from the title.  That’s right: with Thiem leading 7-6(4) 5-1 30-0, the Basher just quit.  He had seen a trainer earlier in the set, but was not visibly injured. He’d just battled through many deuces in the penultimate game, before tanking the first two points on the D(en)ominator’s** serve. Made for a very surreal trophy ceremony a few minutes later, I must say.

Thiem About To Pick Up His Trophy And Monetary Consideration

Thiem About To Pick Up His Trophy And Monetary Consideration

$35,000 Campinas Challenger (Red Clay) – The title match here will be contested between unseeded Facundo Bagnis and Guilherme Clezar, but special mention must be made of 20-year-old American Bjorn Fratangelo making his first ever challenger semi-final here.  So this is that special mention.

Seeing as the 2011 Roland Garros Boys Champion hadn’t had a main draw challenger win before this tourney, to go down to Brazil and get three main draw wins there (including one against an actual Brazilian) is an excellent effort. And when the new rankings come out on Monday, Bjorn will rocket past his career high of ATP #331 all the way into the Top 300.  As you might recall, some idiots were just writing about the lack of young Americans posting career highs of late; hopefully this will shut them up.

FRATMAN

FRATMAN

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